Fly Tying Bench Plans

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So you want to build your own fly tying bench, eh??? And you’re in search of some fly tying bench plans? Well, that’s why you’re here isn’t it? Let me guess… you’ve been to dozens of websites already and just haven’t been able to find any fly tying bench plans you like. You just haven’t found that magical fly tying bench you’ve been dreaming of? Well, you’re not alone.

So why build your own bench? Well, there are many different reasons. If you’re anything like me (and I’ve found that many fly fishermen are), then fly fishing has become a journey for you. When I started, I visited the local fly shops and bought what they told me to. After about a year of that, this just didn’t satisfy me anymore. Why cast a fly made by someone else? The true joy of catching trout comes from crafting a fly imitation by your own hand that is good enough to fool a trout. To do this effectively, you need a nice fly tying bench to work from. Now I’m not so naive as to think I have the fly tying bench plans that absolutely everyone is going to love but I will tell you this, I have received more emails than I ever imagined from people who love this fly tying bench design and want me to send them the plans for it. Why? It’s simple. Because these fly tying bench plans allow the budget-minded fly tyer to build a high quality, functional and very affordable fly tying bench without needing any woodworking tools. It’s really that simple.

This fly tying bench is the result of many hours spent online (as some of you have done already), many conversations with fly tying friends and probably most importantly, many fly tying classes where I was able to speak to others just like you and me about what they liked and disliked about the fly tying benches they were using.

I’ve just never been able to figure out why anyone would want to go out and spend literally hundreds of dollars on those huge, elaborate, professionally made fly tying desks when you can build your own professional-looking fly tying bench for so much less.

So what are you waiting for? Don’t put it off any longer. You’ve finally found what you’re looking for. Isn’t that a great feeling?

Fly Tying Bench plans

Materials List

  • *Qty 1 – Oak 24” x 11 ¼” x ¾” thick
  • *Qty 2 – Oak 24” x 3 ½” x ¾” thick
  • *Qty 4 – Oak 24” x 2 ½” x ¾” thick
  • *Qty 1 – Oak 24” x 1 ½” x ¾” thick
  • Qty 21 – 1 ¼” drywall (or other) screws
  • Qty 7 – Oak wood plugs
  • Qty 1 – 3’ x ¼” dowel rod Wood glue
  • Polyurethane 80 and 150 grit sandpaper
  • Fine steel wool

Tools needed

  • Pipe clamps (optional)
  • Hole punch
  • Miter saw (substitute – hand saw)
  • Pencil
  • Tape measure Drill
  • Rubber mallet/hammer
  • 7/64”, 1/8” , 1/4″ and 3/8” drill bit(s)
  • Paint brush Router
  • Hack saw/coping saw

*Note – These plans are designed with simplicity in mind. You can do minimal cutting by purchasing this oak, pre-cut “kit” lumber at Lowes or Home Depot. They typically stock these pre-cut widths so that the
only cutting needed is to cut some pieces to length.

Instructions

(refer to photo bench001.jpg for components list)

  1. Glue the large 24” x 11 ¼” piece to a 24” x 2 ½” piece to create the 24” x 13 ¾” base. Use pipe clamps if needed to hold the pieces in place until glue is dry.
  2. While the glue is drying in step 1, cut 2 of the 2 ½” X 24” pieces to a length of 13” (which will become the side arms). Then cut 1 of the 24” x 3 ½” pieces into 2 pieces each with a length of 9” (which will become the supports for the side arms). Last, cut the 24” x 1 ½” piece to a length of 22 3/8”
  3. Figure out which side of the base to use as the top and turn it upside down. Mark the location of four holes to be drilled to attach the rear shelf support and three holes down the left and right sides to attach the side arm supports (as shown in photo Bench002.jpg). Use a hole punch to start the holes and pre-drill a 7/64” hole. Then use a 3/8” bit and countersink the hole slightly to accommodate the head of the drywall screw. Use photo bench002.jpg as a reference for placement
    of these ten holes.
  4. Next, using the measurements in step 3, mark and pre-drill the holes (7/64” drill bit) on the underside of the rear shelf support and the supports for the two side arms Start the four screws along the back edge of the base. Apply a tiny bead of wood glue to the bottom of the rear edge support. Hold it in place as you drive the 4 screws in to securely fasten the
    rear edge support.
  5. Start the three screws along the right side for the right side arm support. Apply a tiny bead of wood glue to the bottom of the right side arm support. Hold it in place as you drive the three screws in to securely fasten the right side arm.
  6. Repeat step 6 for the left side arm support.
  7. Pre-drill 2 7/64” holes on the rear right and left sides of the rear shelf support. Then use a 3/8” bit and countersink the hole slightly to accommodate the head of the drywall screw. Drive two drywall screws into the left rear and right rear of the rear shelf support to securely fasten it to the left and right side arm supports.
  8. Align the rear shelf across the top of the rear shelf support so that the front edge is flush forming a lip out the back side (refer to photo bench001.jpg for placement). Pre-dill 3 holes as before but this time making sure to countersink to a depth of ¼” to accommodate the wood plug. Fasten the rear shelf with 3 drywall screws.
  9. Now find the joint in the base where you glued the 2 ½” piece to the 11 ¼” piece to form the base. Take the 1 ½” x 22 3/8” piece and place it on top of that joint, wedging it between the left and right side arm supports. If it fits, run a small bead of wood glue across the bottom edge and set it in place across that joint in the base. If it does not fit while dry fitting it, pull it out and sand down one of the edges until it does fit. Then glue it and put in place. This divider forms a small compartment in the rear of the base to put small objects like dubbing wax, head cement, small pliers, etc.
  10. Align the left side arm across the top of the left side arm support so that the outside edge is flush forming a lip on the inside (refer to photo bench001.jpg for placement). Make sure that the side arm butts up against the rear shelf. Pre-dill 2 holes following the same procedure as in step 9. Fasten with 2 drywall screws.
  11. Follow the same procedures in step 10 to attach the right side arm.
  12. Sand all rough edges to your liking.
  13. Take a router and round all the edges of the side arms and rear shelf. Finish sand when done. Take the dowel rod and cut it into 17 2 ¼” pieces with a hack saw or coping saw and lightly sand the top of each piece to take away the rough edges.
  14. Next we’ll drill the holes on the rear shelf to set the dowels in place which will hold your spools of thread. You will stagger each one. Start at the center and make a mark in 1” from the rear side. Next, measure to the left 1 3/8” and in 1” from the front edge of the rear shelf. Then measure 1 3/8” to the left and in 1” from the rear again. Continue this until you have 9 placements including the first center point. Repeat the same to the right of the center dowel. Refer to photo bench003.jpg for proper placement. Once your marks are made, use a ¼” drill bit and drill to a depth of ¼” (hint: use a piece of masking tape on your drill bit to mark the ¼” depth). Take the dowels and tap each one in lightly using a rubber mallet or hammer so that they are each standing at a height of 2”.
  15. Next mark 6 holes, each 1 ½” apart and centered down the left side arm. Refer to photo bench003.jpg for placement. Drill these holes also with a ¼” bit
  16. Repeat step 17 on the right side arm except using a 1/8” drill bit instead of the ¼” bit.
  17. Take 7 wood plugs and place a dab of wood glue on each one and place in the 7 screw holes in the left and right side arms and in the rear shelf
  18. Do any final finish sanding.
  19. Remove all dust and particles and brush on a coat of polyurethane. Allow to dry to the manufacturers specifications. Lightly sand with fine steel wool. Remove all dust again. Brush on final coat of polyurethane. Allow to dry again.
  20. You’re ready to use. Finished bench should look like this:
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